Step Number 14 – Storage

Home 9 The Steps of Baking 9 Step Number 14 – Storage

The best storage place for bread is inside your belly 🙂 But to be honest a good old bread bin does the job well.

Cooling down completely and wrapping up in clingfilm will prolong the life of certain breads. A simple tea towel can keep flatbreads pliable and sweet buns soft.

If you want to freeze bread, then slice it first so that you can take it out in servings.

Bread starts going stale as soon as it comes out the oven. That is just how it is. Eat it whilst it is fresh. I bake smaller batches so that I can bake more often and always have fresh bread.

Breads made using preferments or sourdough breads will last the longest because of the acidity. The acids prevent it from going mouldy.

But when it comes to the best shelf life then rye bread is the one. It will stay fresh for the longest.

Never ever refrigerate your bread as it will go stale even more quickly contrary to popular belief!

Watch the video here

Understanding the principles of bread making will let you be in complete control every time you make bread. It will reduce the failure rate and turn you into an even more confident home baker.

I highly recommend you check out the Learning page where I have detailed, easy to understand explanations on each step of the bread baking process and the principles behind it.

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