Easiest Ever Rye Bread Pan Loaf Recipe

Home 9 Bread With Preferment 9 Easiest Ever Rye Bread Pan Loaf Recipe

My rye bread recipe was already super simple. But now I have made it even simpler by turning it into a pan loaf.

By fermenting and baking the loaf in a tin we are skipping a few steps, and this will also mean that we do not need a basket for fermentation. If you have never tried making rye bread, then this one should definitely be on your list of future bakes. The flavour is so complex not only because of the distinct taste of rye, but also because of prefermenting half of the total flour in the recipe. This adds a sour note to it. You can customize it with any additional seeds or nuts as well.

For me, the black treacle works best because of its intensity and dark colour. But you can replace it with malt syrup or even honey.

This recipe is for a 500g (1lb) loaf tin. To make a larger loaf simply multiply the amount of ingredients.

Do not get discouraged as you mix it because rye flour makes the dough feel like glue. It is seriously thick and sticky. Just work quickly and with a light touch and it will be fine. The beauty of this bread is its simplicity as you only have to mix it up, pop it into a tin and leave it to ferment.  

Watch the video down below for detailed instructions.

Ingredients

For the preferment

150g (5.3oz) rye flour

150g (5.3oz) water

Small pinch of yeast

 

For the main dough

150g (5.3oz) rye flour

60g (2.1oz) seeds of your choice

30g (1oz) black treacle or any sweet syrup of your choice

2g (0.07oz) dry yeast or 3x the amount of fresh yeast

5g (0.2oz) salt

90g (3.2oz) water at around 20C (68F)

To learn more about dough temperature when using a preferment click here.

Method

  1. Make the preferment by mixing the water, pinch of yeast and flour until smooth and fermenting for 10 hours or until visibly puffed up and full of bubbles.
  2. Mix the remaining water, yeast, treacle, salt and add to the preferment along with the seeds. Mix until well combined and smooth.
  3. Add the remaining flour and mix once again until well combined.
  4. Tip the dough out on a floured surface and using your hands coat it in flour and shape it into a loaf. Desired dough temperature 25-26C (77-78F). If your dough is warmer, then reduce the proofing time. If it is cooler, then extend the proofing time.
  5. Place in a tin and ferment for 2 hours or until well puffed up and cracked all over. During the final hour of fermentation preheat your oven to 160C (320F) fan on.
  6. Bake the bread for 50 minutes or until a core temperature of 94C (200F).
  7. Leave in the tin for around 10 minutes before removing.

Let it cold down completely before cutting. You should ideally leave it for 24 hours. But if you are impatient like I am, then you could cut it open one hour after baking.

Watch the video here

Understanding the principles of bread making will let you be in complete control every time you make bread. It will reduce the failure rate and turn you into an even more confident home baker.

I highly recommend you check out the Learning page where I have detailed, easy to understand explanations on each step of the bread baking process and the principles behind it. You can find all the equipment I use and recommend in the Shop (UK) & Shop (US) pages.

Show/Hide Comments (3 comments)
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3 Comments

  1. eoin

    iam in the process of making this bread. I used wholemeal rye flout. hope its okay. also used doves farm quick yeast. hopefully my preferment rises over night. looking forward to seeing how it turns out. iam also going use honey and not bother with seeds as I don’t like them.

    Reply
  2. Laura

    Hi! I am a new follower from Argentina, trying to get a good rye bread out of my baking, I wanted to ask you about the preferment, do I leave it in the fridge for 10 hours? It’s summer time here and very hot, I don’t want to ruin it. Love your videos. Thanks, Laura.

    Reply
    • ChainBaker

      Hi Laura. Welcome to the channel/website 🙂
      You can ferment it at room temperature first until you see some activity. Then refrigerate it until needed. To better observe it you can place it in a glass jar. That way it will be easy to spot the fermentation bubbles.
      Cheers!

      Reply

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