How to Make Angolan Corn & Rice Bread

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Angolan Corn & Rice Bread with Coconut Oil.

Another one for the Baking World Tour. Angola, situated on the West Coast of Southern Africa is the second largest Portuguese speaking country in the World. The Portuguese influence is represented in the cuisine which is a mix of Portuguese and Southern African.

Hence my choice of corn & rice bread served alongside a feijoada. The cornbread is characteristically African because corn is one of the main crops. While the rice provides and interesting texture the real star is the coconut oil. It gives it such a fragrance and sweetness.

Feijoada is a Portuguese meat and bean stew which is quite different in other countries. This is a very quick feijoada compared to others. And that is what makes this meal ideal for an easy lunch or dinner.

Cornbread is one of the easiest breads to make.

The feijoada is enough for 3 – 4 people as it is quite rich and together with the bread makes for a substantial meal.

Watch the video down below for detailed instructions.

Ingredients

For the bread

125g (4.4oz) white flour

125g (4.4oz) fine cornmeal

9g (0.3oz) baking powder

6g (0.2oz) salt

100g (3.5oz) cooked rice

150g (5.3oz) warm milk, around 30C (86F).

2 medium sized eggs, around 100g (3.5oz) in total.

30g (1oz) coconut oil

 

20g (0.7oz) coconut oil to grease the pan

 

For the feijoada –

200g (7oz) tinned beans. I used cannellini beans, but you can use any beans you like.

250g (8.8oz) diced chicken thighs

250g (8.8oz) diced chorizo

6 cloves garlic, chopped

400g (14.1oz) chopped tomatoes. 1 small tin.

1 onion, chopped

1 carrot, halved and sliced

Pinch of chili flakes or some fresh chili

4 bay leaves

30g (1oz) palm oi. You can use any oil. I used palm oil because it is commonly used in Angola and it gives the feijoada a bright red colour. Although the chorizo and tomatoes do that too.

Chopped parsley to serve

Method

  1. Before you do anything else start preheating your oven and the loaf tin to 180C (355F) fan on.
  2. Whilst the oven is preheating make the feijoada. In a pan on high heat add the oil and the chorizo. Cook for around 5 minutes until coloured nicely. Add the onion and garlic. Cook for another 5 minutes until the onion and garlic become translucent. Add the rest of the ingredients. Bring up to a simmer, turn the heat down low and cook for 45 minutes.
  3. Make the cornbread. Mix the wet and dry ingredients separately. You must use warm milk to melt the coconut oil. Now add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients and whisk together.
  4. Take the hot tin out of the oven and melt the 20g coconut oil in it. The heat in the pan and the oil will prevent the bread from sticking and it will give it a nice golden-brown crust and extra flavour.
  5. Pour in the batter. Spread it out evenly. The next step is optional, but it is a great trick for making the bread open the way you want it to. Place a little bit of coconut oil in a piping bag and draw a line of it across the loaf. This will make the crack appear on that line. If you do not do this, then the bread will crack open in a random place. Which is ok, but this way you are in control. The same trick can be use when making a loaf cake. Instead of coconut oil you would use melted butter.
  6. Bake the loaf for around 30 – 35 minutes or until the internal temperature reads above 94C (200F). Once ready let it set in the tin for 15 minutes before removing.

 

Enjoy!

Watch the video here

Understanding the principles of bread making will let you be in complete control every time you make bread. It will reduce the failure rate and turn you into an even more confident home baker.

I highly recommend you check out the Learning page where I have detailed, easy to understand explanations on each step of the bread baking process and the principles behind it.

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